Tag Archives: Toronto foodies

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Congratulations on 1st anniversary to Isaan Der Thai restaurant in Toronto

Earlier this week, I had the pleasure of joining owners Donald Drouin and Chef Ko as they celebrated their 1st anniversary of serving authentic north-eastern Thai cuisine to diners in The Junction neighbourhood as well as across the city. ISAAN DER is a cozy restaurant located along the Dundas Street W stretch known as restaurant mile and over the past twelve months, they’ve earned many loyal foodie fans who dine-in or order online for personal pick-up or via 3 of the city’s leading delivery services.  www.isaander.comstorefront20171101_145157Attending the auspicious occasion were local City Councillor Sarah Doucette and her aide Catherine (below centre), online influencer Vernon Chang a.k.a. MoVernie (3rd from L), and local food producers/entrepreneurs Sandra and Carlos Dasilva from No.7 Hot Sauce (at left)who were on hand to raise a glass of cheer with Donald, Chef Ko and their staff.20180313_181638Regular diners were also treated to celebratory mimosas and some fruity treats…20180313_171817MoVernie interviewed Donald & Chef Ko for his blog and social media, then took some great close-up photos of his meal…20180313_174445 20180313_191226To celebrate this special milestone, Isaan Der is actually giving gifts to their customers – complimentary $20 gift cards (while supplies last) when diners spend $50 or more (before tax, tips or alcohol) for in-house dining or online personal pick-up orders, so make sure you visit or order your pick-up meals between March 13 – 18 to take advantage of this great reward.20171126_164001(0)So here’s to another year’s success and even more deelish Thai feasts with friends and family!20180313_164131

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TORONTO’S URBANSOURCE CATERING CELEBRATES 32YR ANNIVERSARY TODAY!

I’d like to offer a very special shout-out to my friends Wayne Abell and Calvin Hambrook who, as UrbanSource Catering, have fed-n-watered Toronto’s corporate and private sectors for 32 years….yes, today is their anniversary and I’m thrilled to present them with this virtual celebration!

Starting off on Yonge Street (south of Eglinton), Wayne and Calvin (pictured below L to R) opened their first store in 1985 offering prepared foods, lattes and lots of catering advice.Crazy Owners Opening DayThey soon outgrew their quaint shop housed in a terrace of historical buildings, and based on customer demands, they changed the business model from a retail store-come caterers to a full service catering company. The catering biz grew fast so they moved to their current location on Queen Street East which houses a large commercial kitchen and a suite of offices. Several years ago, the space next door became vacant so Calvin and Wayne took that over and launched Urban Gallery, a non-commission independent art gallery that also serves as a great event space for rent. Needless to say, they cater ALL the events in the gallery.20161216_184023 20160930_181245 20140918_175000Apart from their corporate events, private parties and spectacular wedding soirees, UrbanSource Catering has supported many of Toronto’s philanthropic causes, catering fundraisers, media launches and special events, eg: United Church’s Heart & Vision Awards, Fife House, PRIDE Toronto, plus the annual InsideOut Film Festival.

Bravo and congratulations to Calvin, Wayne and the staff of UrbanSource Catering – you continually deliver the best, on time and on budget!Calvin, Wayne and the URBAN SOURCE CATERING Crew

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MEET LYNDON WIEBE, EXECUTIVE CHEF OF URBANSOURCE CATERING IN TORONTO

For the past few years, I’ve been blogging about and promoting the talented foodie folks who work at URBANSOURCE CATERING here in Toronto, and have come to admire their executive chef LYNDON WIEBE for not only his super deelish food but also for his outstanding photography snapped during his many adventures abroad. In fact, Lyndon had a solo photographic art show at the adjoining Urban Gallery a couple of years ago (see below).Invitation Image Masai Tribesman Tanzania DSC_1155 20150115_165421(0) 20150115_165433Lyndon’s pictures captured real life in-situ in some of the remotest outposts of humanity, and his engagement and relationships with the local people can clearly be seen in his images. Below, Lyndon poses modestly in front of one of my favourite pictures.20150115_172636I recently asked him about the transition from globe-trotting chef/photographer to executive chef at UrbanSource Catering and he kindly shared his thoughts here:

How long have you been executive chef at UrbanSource Catering?  In March of 2017, I will have been the Executive Chef at Urban Source for five years. With Urban Gallery next door, there are always receptions and corporate soirees to cater on a weekly basis.CAs a celebrity chef from the successful travel/food tv series (Chefs Run Wild, how did you adjust to being a little more “chained to the stove” working in a commercial/catering kitchen with staff to manage?  I think celebrity chef is a bit of a strong word, maybe minor television celebrity chef is more accurate…LOL I am by no means a Chuck Hughes or Anthony Bourdain, but it is flattering nonetheless. We were referred to as “Baby Bourdains” in an article on us in the National Post newspaper, which I thought was funny.CRW.71130027

Lyndon behind the camera, shooting a segment for Chefs Run Wild in S.E. Asia

Lyndon behind the camera, shooting a segment for Chefs Run Wild in S.E. Asia

I lived, traveled and worked overseas for over 7 years and have been working in kitchens since I was sixteen, so coming back to work in Urban’s kitchen was nothing new to me, as I have always been a hands-on chef. Don’t get me wrong, the whole television experience was exciting and exhilarating, but was also exhausting and, at times, filled with anxiety. Would I trade that experience for anything? Absolutely not!  It was incredible and showed me a different side of television which was cool, however, it was fleeting – for me cooking is not fleeting and will always be a big part of my life. So, after my nice seven month break when I moved to Toronto, I was more than happy to take over the reigns in a new kitchen with a new crew at Urban.

You’re also an accomplished photographer and artist – do you continue to undertake camera safaris or have you adapted your photography to include food and presentations?  Yes, I’m still an avid photographer and still go on photo safaris when the time and weather allows. I just got an iPhone and have started using it a lot more as portable camera to take shots on my ride to and from work or when I’m out and about in the city. It comes in handy and the quality of the images has definitely improved with the technology.  As for food photography, it’s not really my thing. I think I just got sick of everybody taking photos and showing the world what they were eating on Instagram every single day. There are tons of beautiful food photographs out there and it makes me want to eat every dish I see, but as a subject matter I prefer streetscapes, nature and people. My girlfriend only recently convinced me to set up an Instagram account (@LyndonWiebe), so I have been using that as a means to show my work. Call me old fashioned, I just fight new technology sometimes even though it is helpful, just for the sake of fighting it. Can’t teach an old dog new tricks etc, although it’s more like this old dog just doesn’t want to learn new tricks. On top of that, I have an online gallery to sell my works and have just recently been asked to join Vida at their request. Vida is a company that lets artists transform their artwork into their own fashion line. I upload my artwork and from there I can choose to put that design onto shirts, pillows, blankets, scarves and many other accessories and create my own fashion line – it’s quite a neat concept. I’m just in the beginning stages of that venture so it will take a while to get it off the ground.  My online portfolio is located here: https://www.direct2artist.com/artists/lyndonwiebe

20150115_165637 20150115_171715As Urban’s chef, you’re responsible for creative exciting menus each season for clients – what has been your most challenging catering project to date?  One of our biggest clients has a standing order for catered meals for their staff four to five days a week. The biggest challenge lies in keeping the menus fresh, creative and in budget without repeating menus if we can help it, or unless they ask for a specific menu again. Doing that for fifty weeks a year can be a challenge as you always have to be thinking about availability of ingredients depending on what season you are in. It is even more of a challenge when they ask for stuff that is not in season, but with imports these days we can get fruits and veggies of all varieties year round. But a strawberry in January in Toronto is not going to taste as good as an Ontario strawberry in the summertime. It’s being able to source an ingredient and make sure you can still deliver the flavours they expect.Peppercorn Beef Tenderloin Crostini with caramelized onionCF233520160531_18421720160531_184035As we move closer to Spring, what food items or dishes are on your radar as trend-setting and that will be added to the seasonal Urban Catering menus?  With Spring comes the shift away from tuber and root vegetable heavy dishes, which I am always excited about. We will start to see rhubarb, fiddle heads, peas, asparagus, radish, spring beets, and in June the strawberry and cherry season begins. We also see fresh cauliflower come June, so hopefully that will bring the price of it down as it is pretty expensive right now.  When it comes to fresh vegetables, I tend to let the foods speak for themselves. Peas and asparagus are given a quick blanch and tossed in a little butter and salt and pepper. Beets can be shaved with fresh radish and thrown in a kale and grain salad. Ramps and fiddle heads I love to put in a light and delicate quiche. Rhubarb can finely sliced and thrown in salads to give them an unexpected crunch and tartness or make a strawberry & rhubarb crumble which is always a favourite. Cauliflower is one of my favourite vegetables as it has so many applications. Tacos are still huge in the food scene so for vegetarians – we offer spicy cauliflower tacos in place of beef or chicken tacos. Also good for Korean fried cauliflower (which people can’t seem to get enough of) or Buffalo cauliflower “wings”. My favourite dish that I came up with is cauliflower laap, or larb depending where you come from. It’s an adaptation of the traditional pork or chicken dish found in Thailand and Laos. It’s a cooked crumbled meat dish that is served room temperature with fresh shallot, mint, cilantro, fish sauce, lime juice, bird’s eye chilies and toasted ground rice. The flavours are incredible.

During production of Chefs Run Wild, you cooked weird and wonderful ingredients from around the world – what’s your favourite international cuisine to cook and what’s the strangest ingredient you had to use on the show?   It’s hard to say what cuisine is my favourite to cook because in that region of South East Asia, their flavours and ideas are very similar and they all borrow off of each other and add their own twists. Anything from Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore are my favourite foods to cook and eat, even Laos has amazing food. It’s the balance of flavours that I learned from there when cooking that style of food that is the most important thing. Sweet, sour, spicy, salty and bitter are the five flavours you always have to consider when creating a perfectly balanced dish. If you have all of these flavours in your dish, you have created something special.IMG_3587In terms of weird ingredients, there are many. There is an area in Thailand known as the Issan Province on the border with Laos. It is very agriculturally poor. The land is not suitable for farming and they cannot grow a lot there so the people have lived off whatever the land provides them with. So they eat a lot of bugs and insects for protein wand they employ odd flavor combinations at times. Ant egg salad was a classic recipe we learned. The ant eggs themselves look like yogurt covered raisins, until you put one in your mouth and it pops like a giant pimple in your mouth – let me tell you, the pop is very unsettling…it was like eating a small eyeball! The experience makes me cringe, but for the people of Issan, it’s a normal everyday meal.  IMG_3466Another thing they used over there was pork blood. Now, congealed or cooked pork blood in cubes is quite common over there and you see it everywhere. It is actually quite delicious. But in Issan we made a dish called “pork waterfall”(that was the literal translation) and to top off this dish they had a squeeze bottle of raw pork blood diluted with vinegar which they just poured over top of the dish. Not going to lie, it was not very appetizing at all. We couldn’t even finish it, but we had had to try it, because you don’t know till you try.IMG_3524Any advice for people considering engaging a caterer for their special event, wedding or corporate soiree?  What do they need to consider – budget, type of food, venue, service, etc?  Wwhen you call a caterer, it’s important to have a vision of what you want and it’s also important to have a realistic and flexible budget in mind. I say realistic, because some clients call and want five courses of food with full waiter service, but only have $5 per person in their budget and are unprepared by the real costs of hosting a catering. I also recommend getting a few different quotes so you can compare what’s on offer. It’s no different than buying a car or a house.  Check the UrbanSource Catering website to see a selection of menus that appeal to every taste, every occasion and every budget. www.urbancatering.com

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KANGA AUSSIE MEAT PIES CELEBRATES 2nd ANNIVERSARY IN TORONTO…YUMMM

I was thrilled to celebrate KANGA AUSSIE MEAT PIE’s two years of feeding Toronto’s hungry tummies when I dropped in to enjoy a couple of meat pies and some Lamingtons, too!

I must admit to a twinge of homesick blues as I walked thru the balloon-bedecked doorway….growing up DownUnder, meat pies were a staple on every school kid’s menu. Our school tuckshop doled out thousands of them at lunchtimes over the course of a year and I can still remember the glorious fragrance of fresh baked pies coming from the kitchen wafting through the class windows. That memory came back the minute I walked into Kanga!20160516_11425320160516_114921(0) As I walked in, my salivary glands were working overtime and Erynn welcomed me with a big smile from the front window….20160516_114306I immediately made myself at home with a steaming “traditional” Aussie pie topped with ketchup, or as we call it in Oz, tomato sauce. 20160516_115854 20160516_121732 20160516_121847….and soon made short shrift of the whole thing. Believe me, if I wasn’t out in public I would have licked the plate, too!!! The crust was flakey and light, just the way they make ’em back home.  And of course, no Aussie meat pie is complete until you finish up with a Lamington…..yummmmmm.20160516_114942 20160516_115545Erynn and Megan had lots of Kanga fans dropping in to wish them a happy anniversary, including these two lovely ladies who tucked right in…apparently they’re frequent flyers here at Kanga!20160516_122511Thanks for the great DownUnder hospitality, Kanga, and I can’t wait to come back for more.Logo card

Kanga Aussie Meat Pies, 65 Duncan St (south off Queen St W, just W of University Ave), Toronto.
Check their website for all the different pie flavours they offer: www.eatkanga.com20160516_121425PS: Look what Megan gave me as a surprise treat to go…OMG, I’m in Lammie heaven!20160516_130115(0)

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I VISIT “THE OTHER QUEEN STREET” FESTIVAL IN TORONTO….BUT NOT TOO MANY OTHER PEOPLE DO

Thanks to social media promotions and emails from Mark Gleberzon of MJG Gallery on Queen East near Carlaw, I decided to visit the inaugural TOQS (The Other Queen Street) shop, sip and stroll event hosted by the local BIA…it was one of the hottest humid days this summer (so far) – not the most ideal conditions for an asthmatic like myself. I was looking forward to joining the locals in celebrating this groovy neighbourhood known for its vintage and antique stores, home decor, fashion and foodie retailers, but sadly you could almost hear the crickets chirping! There was virtually no focus and no ta-daa excitement for what was advertised as an inaugural annual street festival event. In fact, the street felt and looked more like this….vitnageI know it’s hard presenting neighbourhood celebrations but when you have BIA (Business Improvement Association) funding, engaged & motivated retailers/restaurants wanting to reach new customers and thousands of int’l visitors looking for cool inexpensive activities thanks to the PanAm Games, the lack of promotions, publicity and a simple marketing campaign made for a very sad visit to one of my favourite places in Toronto’s downtown area…Leslieville. At least I discovered a fascinating new home decor store and visited a gallery known for supporting local artists. Join me now for a virtual stroll…..

As I walked east from the Carlaw bus stop, I first noticed this lovely store – Home James – featuring home decor, gifts and accessories, all very affordable and a delightful array of treasures.

20150718_122300 20150718_121625 20150718_121355 20150718_121532I spoke briefly with owner/curator James Lane (pictured below) who also does home staging and interior decorating for clients, and he, too, was rather disappointed with the lack of signage, street and lightpole banners.

20150718_121124I was delighted, tho, when I discovered some wonderful art on his walls courtesy of local artists, esp. the charcoal farm animal drawings of Susan O’Neil (below)…I so want the little sheep at the bottom. Isn’t she gorgeous?

20150718_121418 20150718_121423 20150718_121426Jane Theodore‘s colourful graphic works and greeting cards were also a great find (below)…

20150718_121612….and lots more great art and finds. I spotted several potential Christmas gifts here so I’ll be going back for sure. Please check out the store yourself at 998 Queen St East, Toronto. www.homejamesdecor.com

20150718_122220 20150718_122229Next, on to MJG Gallery at 1028 Queen East to visit my friend, gallery owner and artist Mark Gleberzon and thank goodness his A/C was up full-blast. By the time I walked the one block from Home James, the humidity had turned my freshly coiffed hair into a blonde furball and my mascara had melted down my cheeks!

20150718_122835 20150718_122839Mark was having a sidewalk sale of art books, wood carvings and art work, taking advantage of what promised to be a busy TOQS Saturday. He was in the midst of re-arranging the gallery, moving some of the massive pieces around so I had fun taking pics of all the paintings leaning up against the walls and furniture….lots of work by some of my fave artists including Mark’s own work (1st 2 pics below). http://mjggallery.com/

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20150718_123745I loved the happy robots waving goodbye to gallery visitors (below)….so friendly and cute, they made me smile!

20150718_123736I do hope the Leslieville BIA folks get it together for next year, perhaps even upload the event to their website, too. No, the poster was not there, nor were there any event details of the who, what, where, when, why of TOQS. Their blog which promotes the “latest news” from the neighbourhood shows outdated 2014 posts, nothing about today’s event. There were no balloons, no music, no street food (hey, food trucks are always looking for new locations) and no banners telling passers by to stop and take a stroll along the several blocks of Leslieville.

As a publicist and marketing consultant, I cannot stress enough the need for neighbourhoods and their Business Improvement Associations to effectively use social media for promotions, keep their websites updated, notify local newspapers and bloggers and reaching out to organizations such as Tourism Toronto to attract visitors. You don’t just post something on your Facebook then hope people find you. The potential for today’s event was extraordinary, but sadly they missed the mark by a mile. Next year, I hope to visit a whole new exciting and well-promoted TOQS…I’m rooting for them.